LRFF logo
9 TH ANNUAL
MAY 11-17
2015
LRFF2015 Announces its Golden Rock Documentary Lineup

LRFF2015 Announces its Golden Rock Documentary Lineup

Little Rock Film Festival is proud to announce its 2015 Golden Rock Documentary Competition Lineup, curated by LRFF’s Artistic Director, Brent Renaud.   LRFF2015 passes are available online for purchase HERE. Barge, (71min), USA Director – Ben Powell Barge Facebook page Twitter – @bargefilm Dry land’s misfits find purpose and direction twenty-eight days at a time as the steady hands of a towboat due for the port of New Orleans.  Cartel Land, (98min), USA, Directing and Cinematogrpahy Award Winner, Sundance Film Festival Director – Matt Heineman Cartel Land Facebook page Twitter – @cartellandmovie CARTEL LAND is a classic western set in the 21st century, pitting vigilantes on both sides of the border against the vicious Mexican drug cartels.  Crocodile Gennadiy, (100min), USA Director – Steve Hoover Crocodile Gennadiy Facebook page Twitter – @gennadiyfilm‬‬‬ ‬‬‬‬ A new film from the Sundance Grand Jury Prize-winning creators of Blood Brother. Gennadiy Mokhnenko has made a name for himself by forcibly abducting homeless drug-addicted kids from the streets of Mariupol, Ukraine. As his country leans towards a European Union inclusion, hopes of continued post-Soviet revitalization seem possible. In the meantime, Gennadiy’s center has evolved into a more nebulous institution.  Drunk Stoned Brilliant and Dead, (93min), USA Director -Douglas Tirola Drunk Stoned Brilliant and Dead Facebook page Three Harvard graduates start the first national humor magazine for adults, launching the careers of some of Hollywood’s most legendary talent.    Holbrook/Twain: An American Odyssey, (95min) Director -Scott Teems Holbrook/Twain: An American Odyssey  Facebook page Since first walking onto stage in 1954, Hal Holbrook has performed his award-winning one-man show as Mark Twain on Broadway, in all fifty states, in...
Q&A with “Life After Death” director Joe Callander

Q&A with “Life After Death” director Joe Callander

Director Joe Callander brings his acclaimed documentary Life After Death to the Little Rock Film Festival this weekend. The film follows the lives of two young men in post-genocide Rwanda. I asked him a few questions about Life After Death, which plays Saturday at 3:15pm and Sunday at 3:30pm at the Clinton School of Public Service. What is a one-sentence synopsis of Life After Death? Joe Callander: Kwasa and his sidekick Fils pick up odd jobs, listen to 2pac on a mobile phone, and work on their Kung-fu skills, twenty years after a genocide. What drew you to this story and why was it important to you to make this film? JC: I was in Rwanda doing some filming for a company called Saddleback Leather when I met Kwasa. He is an outrageous, hilarious and outgoing character, which was rare in the people I met over there. I was drawn to him and his best friend Fils immediately and I became obsessed with telling a kind of story I hadn’t seen come out of Rwanda before…a present day portrait about how things are now for the generation of people in their early 20’s that were born into the most horrific event of a generation. What was your biggest challenge in making it? JC: Central Africa is not an accommodating place to make a film in general. The power is unreliable, especially in rainy season. And I was in a situation where I was essentially working alone. I ran the camera and the sound by myself. Sometimes I would run a two camera setup and sound by myself. It was a...
Q&A with “Manakamana” director Pacho Velez

Q&A with “Manakamana” director Pacho Velez

I caught up with Pacho Velez, who co-directed the much talked-about film Manakamana with Stephanie Spray. Watch the film on the big screen at LRFF2014 Friday at 8:30pm and Saturday at 12:15pm, at the Historic Arkansas Museum. What is Manakamana about? Pacho Velez: Manakamana is a film about pilgrims making a journey to visit the temple of the goddess Manakamana in Nepal. What makes this journey unique is that it’s done by cable car. For hundreds of years, you spent a day walking up the mountain to visit the temple, but the last 15 years you’ve just ridden in the cable car. The film looks at that journey and more broadly the effect of this technological intervention on traditional religious practice in Nepal. But then it does other things too. The film consists of uncut shots of journeys in the cable car. Why did you decide to make this film with that structure? PV: We knew from the start we wanted to shoot whole rides, because it just seemed like a nice way to get to know people. One of the challenges when you’re making films is how do you introduce characters? How do you spend time with a person? Are you constantly cutting from one scene to another with them? How do you learn about a person? Do you learn more about a person if you see them do ten very quick actions or one very long one? So these were some of the thoughts we were having. Why not try something different? Why not just have them be extended periods with each character? And in terms of the order...
Q&A with “Man Shot Dead” director Taylor Feltner

Q&A with “Man Shot Dead” director Taylor Feltner

Man Shot Dead is an intimate portrait of a family living with the legacy of an unexplained murder. Deftly weaving archival imagery with revealing interviews, the film is at once a search for answers and a timely perspective on the cataclysmic, long-lasting effects of gun violence decades after the fact. Tell me a little bit about “Man Shot Dead” Taylor Feltner: Man Shot Dead focuses on my grandfather’s homicide in the 60’s. The film is equal parts investigative but also reflective of the family after that. It’s been 40 years since then and how are they still dealing with it. And how is it still rippling through the family. What part of Arkansas are you from? TF: I’m originally from Russelville, I grew up there. Where was the film made? TF: My family live in Morrilton, my grandmother and my two aunts still live in Morrilton.  We shot a lot there, but we also shot up in Fayetteville, because that is where my mom and dad live. How did you come to this story? It doesn’t seem like a story that would be freely talked about. TF: No, exactly, I mean as kids we knew our granddad had died and that he had been shot, and that was it. I think that’s largely because you’re little kids.  You’re not going to get into this deep story about it. Then as you get older you start to ask a few more questions, and then I got around to asking my brothers, “well, what do you remember?” I wouldn’t go so far as to say we made up the stories, but...
Q&A with “Manny” director Ryan Moore

Q&A with “Manny” director Ryan Moore

We are thrilled to have Director Ryan Moore in town to present his documentary, Manny! Narrated by Liam Neeson and directed by Ryan Moore and Academy Award winner Leon Gast, Manny is an inspirational tale of a man who overcame insurmountable odds to become one of the most loved and respected athletes of all time. I asked director Ryan Moore a few questions about his film, which you can watch Friday at 12:45pm at the CALS Ron Robinson Theater, or catch it 12:45pm Saturday at the Rep! What is a one-sentence synopsis of Manny? Ryan Moore: Manny is the untold story of boxer Manny Pacquiao, who through a colorful journey inside and outside the ring, has been labeled as this generation’s Muhammad Ali. What drew you to his story? Why was it important to you to make this film? RM: Since I’m Filipino American and lived in the Philippines, it was a dream of mine to film Manny Pacquiao’s life. His story is what fairy tales are made of. He is arguably one of the greatest athletes and personalities to ever come out of the Philippines. Not only is Manny one of the most significant boxers of this era, but he will go down in the boxing hall of fame for setting the Guiness World Record for 8 weight division titles (remains unbeaten). What was your biggest challenge? RM: Filming Manny’s life everyday is like receiving word that a Category 5 tropical storm may be touching ground every morning. You’re constantly unaware of what may happen – his boxing career, political responsibilities, and personal life were all in flux so...