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9 TH ANNUAL
MAY 11-17
2015

7 Questions with David Lipke, Director of Slow Southern Steel

1. Are you an Arkansas Native? If so where are you from? If not, How did you get here? I see myself as a “southern yankee”. I moved to Arkansas from New Jersey in 1983 when I was 12 years old. I just recently turned 40… so I’ve been living in Arkansas for 28 years. I consider myself a true Arkansan! 2. What is the inspiration for your film? The inspiration for Slow Southern Steel is to shine a light on the underground southern metal community and let the viewer experience the hardships along with the trial & tribulations that these bands go through as a result of being from the south. 3. Can you give us a brief synopsis of your film? Slow Southern Steel is a film about heavy music in the modern American South, as told by the very people who have created this music during the last two decades.  Shot  in back alleys, parking lots, and the seedy green rooms of the dirtiest clubs that the Bible Belt failed to snuff out, these diehard musicians discuss their love of music and the south, as well as the difficulties, contradictions, and insanity that haunt every southern artist. There are no illusions here, no apologies, no distractions – only the straight truth as told by those who would know the difference. Narrated by the notorious Dixie Dave Collins (Weedeater, Buzzov-en, Bongzilla), Slow Southern Steel is an authentic and honest and thorough look at one of the most remarkable music communities ever spawned on the continent. 4. What were the biggest challenges and successes you faced on set?...

Arkansas Film Community loses one of its best. Rick Dial

The Arkansas film community lost one of our own this evening. Rick Dial a successful actor and all around great man passed away this afternoon surrounded by friends and family. We will all miss him not only for his art, but for his kind and generous nature. The following is a letter from Harry Thomason on his friend and collaborator. I was screening The Last Ride a few weeks ago for some people in Los Angeles when Rick Dial appeared on the screen, an actress of note turned to me and said, “Who is the guy who is playing the bartender?”. I told her a little about Rick and she said, “He is such a great actor and there is something about him that lights up the entire room.” It is so true, Rick wore an aura of light – you just knew everything was going to be okay if he was around. The world just felt like it was a better place when Rick was there. Rick was born with more natural acting ability in his little finger than a lifetime of study could achieve for most.  I can truly say that never, in a single one of his films, was he caught “acting”.  He didn’t have to act – he just was whatever role he was portraying! I hate the Lord has taken him so soon, we sure could have used him here for a while longer, but on the other hand, I can understand why the Lord wanted him, you can’t have to many good men around you! Rest in peace friend. Harry...

7 Questions with Bruce Hutchinson, Director of Going To Hell

1. Are you an Arkansas Native? If so where are you from? If not, How did you get here? I’m not an Arkansas native.  I grew up in Florida, but I’ve lived a lot of places–Washington D.C., Kansas (go Jayhawks!), Atlanta, Alaska.  I moved here in 2003 from Alaska after my graduate school mentor Joe Anderson called and said he had just been hired to be the chair of the Mass Communication and Theatre program at UCA, and he wanted to know if I wanted to come help him start a filmmaking program.  So I said yes, and have been here ever since. 2. What is the inspiration for your film? I guess I was inspired by those moments in a movie, especially genre movies, where characters go through a major emotional moment but because of the demands of the plot, that moment takes about 30 seconds and then the movie moves on.  In this case, I became fascinated with that moment in horror films where a loved one is turned, or possessed, or infected, and the protagonist has to decide what to do.  I wanted to make an entire film exploring that moment.  I guess its sort of an art film take on horror.  Maybe in the general vein of “Let the Right One In.” 3. Can you give us a brief synopsis of your film? Three people are barricaded in their house during a zombie epidemic: Josh, his wife Hope, and his sister Isabel.  Unfortunately for Josh, Hope and Isabel believe he is infected and have to decide what to do about it. 4. What were the...

7 questions with Allison Hogue, Director of Hitchhiker

1. Are you an Arkansas Native? If so where are you from? If not, How did you get here? I am. I was born and raised in the Delta, so I spent my childhood in McGehee and Dumas, Arkansas. I’ve been in Conway for the last seven years working on my undergraduate and graduate degrees at the University of Central Arkansas, where I’m currently enrolled in the Digital Filmmaking Master of Fine Arts program. 2. What is the inspiration for your film? My spirituality has been a huge part of my life for the past three or four years, so I was passionate about doing a Christian-based film before I graduated from UCA. I wanted it to be accessible and entertaining for a wide audience, though, so I spent a great deal of time thinking about ways to combine entertainment and artistic value with spirituality. After some brainstorming, I remembered a story that one of my uncles told me when I was a kid — a story that he claimed was true — about a woman who picked up a hitchhiker. The woman in the story didn’t usually pick up hitchhikers because she was too frightened to do so, but something during one particular experience told her to give one of them a ride. When the hitchhiker got in the car, the first thing he said was, “The Master’s trumpet is to his lips,” meaning that the end of the world was near, and it shocked her so much that she started driving erratically and was soon pulled over by a policeman. When she tried to explain to the...

Local Film Scene interviews Actor Ed Lowry

1. Are you an Arkansas Native? If so where are you from? If not, How did you get here? I was born and raised in Kansas, though I have fond memories of visiting relatives in Arkansas as a kid.  My cousin gave me a little ceramic Razorback that I held onto for years. I came to Little Rock in December, 2001.  I got a job writing and directing creative elements for a church.  That’s where I first got my hands on Final Cut.  I worked there about 9 years.  Now I’m acting and working freelance in media production. 2. How do you develop the character you are playing beyond the words on the page? First, it’s vital to know what the writer intended. Who is this character?  What does he want?  What does he feel?  Why? Knowing this, I begin to understand what the character thinks about the words he is speaking, his subtext.  Our thought process shows on the face more than we know.  My characters in Pillow and The Jester were all subtext.  They had no lines.  In Ballerina my character had page-length monologues.  What is the meat behind those words?  What leads him to take these actions? The script work done, I try to relax, focus and let the character flow. 3. You are in several films accepted to this year’s Arkansas Films Program. Any advice to other actors on how to get involved in local productions? Build relationships in the local film community and work with others to create opportunities.  Seek and pursue audition experiences and come to the audition prepared (I went cold in...

7 Questions with Kristin Mann, Producer of Pillow and The Orderly

              1. Are you an Arkansas Native? If so where are you from? If not, How did you get here? Yes, I was born and raised in the Little Rock area.  I’ve spent some time in New York and several years in Los Angeles for work but returned to Arkansas a couple of years ago. 2. What is the inspiration for your film? I’m excited to say that I produced two of the films in this year’s festival – PILLOW and THE ORDERLY.  PILLOW was written and directed by the Miller brothers, and THE ORDERLY was written and directed by Daniel Campbell. The Miller brothers have been heavily influenced by Hitchcock and the Coen brothers among others.  With PILLOW, they’ve done an excellent job with establishing their southern gothic filmmaking style. Daniel, I know, finds inspiration in Wes Anderson’s work.  THE ORDERLY is a comedy, which should excite you because Daniel is one of the funniest people I’ve ever met. I’m going to let these guys tell you what inspired them to write each story.  Stay tuned for their interviews over the next few weeks! 3. Can you give us a brief synopsis of your film? PILLOW is a southern gothic tale of two brothers who go to desperate measures to please their overbearing mother. I honestly can’t say much more than that for fear of giving too much away, but Kim Voynar, a film critic at Movie City News, described PILLOW as “gorgeously, stunningly shot, with minimal dialogue and a script with shades OF MICE AND MEN.”  So, there’s a little taste....