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8 TH ANNUAL
MAY 12-18
2014

LRFF Reel Civil Rights Film Festival Complete Schedule

Little Rock Film Festival presents The Reel Civil Rights Film Festival

The film festival features documentaries and films related to past and current civil and human rights issues in the United States and abroad. The festival is free, but tickets are required. To RSVP, log onto www.nps.gov/chsc. Schedule is as follows:

Friday, September 21 – Opening Night

7:00 p.m. – Miss Representation (2011) (90 min). Written, directed and produced by Jennifer Siebel Newsom. Like drawing back a curtain to let bright light stream in, Miss Representation exposes how mainstream media contribute to the under-representation of women in positions of power and influence in America. The film challenges the media’s limited and often disparaging portrayals of women and girls, which make it difficult for women to achieve leadership positions and for the average woman to feel powerful herself.
Location: The Peabody Little Rock, located at Three Statehouse Plaza (Conway Room)

Saturday, September 22

1:00 p.m. – Victory through History: The Power of YOUth! Digital Storytelling Showcase and Panel Discussion. (120 min). Little Rock Central High School National Historic Site’s Youth Leadership Academy will screen a collection of their digital stories and participate in a panel discussion hosted by Arkansas Education Television Network. The digital stories are a compilation of youth produced, short video vignettes showcasing significant moments in the lives of the students. Through the digital stories, the mission is to help develop student leaders, raise consciousness in communities, and encourage creativity in education about civil and human rights. Location: The Peabody Little Rock, located at Three Statehouse Plaza (Conway Room)

3:00 p.m. - A Class Apart (2009) (60 min). Produced and directed by Carlos Sandoval and Peter Miller. In 1951 in the town of Edna, Texas, a field hand named Pedro Hernández murdered his employer after exchanging words at a gritty cantina. From this seemingly unremarkable small-town murder emerged a landmark civil rights case that would forever change the lives and legal standing of tens of millions of Americans. A team of unknown Mexican American lawyers took the case, Hernandez v. Texas, all the way to the Supreme Court, where they successfully challenged Jim Crow-style discrimination against Mexican Americans. Location: The Peabody Little Rock, located at Three Statehouse Plaza (Conway Room)

5:00 p.m. – Civil Rights to Hip Hop: Honoring the Little Rock Nine with Kevin Powell
Kevin Powell, an activist, writer, public speaker, and entrepreneur, was a Democratic candidate for Congress in Brooklyn, New York in 2008 and 2012. Powell has published eleven books, including his newest collection of political and pop culture writings, Barack Obama and The Ghost of Dr. King: Blogs and Essays. A fixture on the pop culture landscape the past several years, Kevin has hosted and produced programming for HBO and BET; written a screenplay, and delivers motivational messages to countless colleges and various organizations.Location: The Peabody Little Rock, located at Three Statehouse Plaza (Conway Room)

5:00 p.m. Climate Refugees (2010) (95 min.) Directed by Michael P. Nash. This documentary film uncovers the unbelievable plight of people around the world displaced by climatically induced environmental disasters. The documentary illuminates for the first time the human face of climate change as civilization now finds itself facing the confluence of overpopulation, lack of resources and a changing climate. Location: The Peabody Little Rock, located at Three Statehouse Plaza (Conway Room)

7:00 p.m. – Brown Babies: The Mischlingskinder Story – (2010) (102 min.) Directed by Regina Griffin. A powerful documentary which tells the story of six so-called “brown babies” born in postwar occupation Germany. They were born to German women and African-American soldiers. As illegitimate, biracial, bicultural children who were unwanted by enemy nations, their lives were tragic. For the first time Brown Babies: The Mischlingskinder Story reveals this little known remarkable piece of history through the compelling life stories of the children and their birth parents. **Note: Filmmaker in Attendance
Location: The Peabody Little Rock, located at Three Statehouse Plaza (Conway Room)

9:00 p.m. – Soul Food Junkies (2011) (90 min.) Directed by Byron Hurt. Soul food is a quintessential American cuisine, with a rich history and an abiding significance to black cultural identity. But with its core celebration of all things fried and smothered, it has also had lasting effects on African Americans’ health, both for better and for worse. Filmmaker Byron Hurt looks at the past and future of soul food – from its roots in Western Africa, to its incarnation in the American South, to its contribution to modern health crises in communities of color. Soul Food Junkies also looks at the socioeconomics of the modern American diet, and how the food industry profits from making calories cheap, but healthy options expensive and hard to find. Location: The Peabody Little Rock, located at Three Statehouse Plaza (Conway Room)

Sunday, September 23

11:00 a.m. - Unfit: Ward vs. Ward (2012) (75 min)Directed by Katie Carmichael, PennyEdmiston, and Edwin Scharlau. In 1995 in Pensacola, Florida, Mary Ward lost custody of her 11 year old daughter, Cassey, to her ex-husband, John Ward, solely based on her sexualorientation. John, a convicted murderer and alleged child molester, was deemed a betterparent by the court system that said the child deserved to be raised in a non lesbian world, even though the courts own appointed social worker testified in defense of the mother. An appeal court upheld the decision in 1996. Mary Ward died of a heart attack in January of 1997 while awaiting the outcome of her second appeal. Location: Argenta Community Theater, 405 Main Street in North Little Rock.

1:00 p.m.Time of Fear (2005) (60 min.) Directed by Sue Williams. In World War II, more than 110,000 Japanese Americans were forced to leave their homes and relocate to War Relocation Centers across the western United States. Time of Fear tells the story of the 16,000 men, women and children who were sent to two camps in southeast Arkansas, one of the poorest and most racially segregated places in America. **Note: Guest speaker: Dr. Johanna Miller Lewis, Historian, Project Director for “Life Interrupted: The Japanese American Experience in World War II Arkansas”Location: Argenta Community Theater, 405 Main Street in North Little Rock

3:00 p.m. – Memphis 13 (2011) (35 min). Directed by Daniel Kiel. On October 3, 1961, thirteen African American first graders broke the color line in the Memphis City Schools. The Memphis 13 is their story. The documentary features interviews with all 13 pioneering families and other key individuals – students, teachers, leaders – who lived through this historic time. **Note: Filmmaker in Attendance
Location: Argenta Community Theater, 405 Main Street in North Little Rock

5:00 p.m. – The Thick Dark Fog (2011) (57 min). Directed by Randy Vasquez. Walter Littlemoon attended a federal Indian boarding school in South Dakota 60 years ago. The mission of many of these schools in 1950 was to “kill the Indian and save the man.” The children were not allowed to speak their language or express their culture or Native identity in any way at the risk of being severly beaten, humiliated or abused. This is the story of how Littlemoon confronted “the thick dark fog” of his past so that he could renew himself and his community.**Note: Filmmaker in Attendance
Location: Argenta Community Theater, 405 Main Street in North Little Rock

7:00 p.m. – A Conversation with 1968 Olympic Gold Medalist Tommie SmithTommie Smith and John Carlos shocked the world in 1968 when they raised their fists wearing black gloves in a black power salute during the medal ceremony at the Mexico City Olympics. Leading up to the games in Mexico, the American black athletes considered a boycott of the games to protest a long list of grievances including racism in the United States, the lack of Black Coaches in the Olympics, and the inclusion of Apartheid South Africa in the Games. **Special guest Tommie Smith will be in attendance. Book and poster signing! Location: Argenta Community Theater, 405 Main Street in North Little Rock

Tuesday, September 25 – Closing Night

6:00 p.m. – Film Screening, Ceremony to Honor Little Rock Nine and Harry Belafonte
Screening of Harry Belafonte’s documentary, Sing Your Song: The Music, Hope and Vision of a Man and an Era, guest remarks by Mr. Belafonte; and an awards ceremony to honor both the Little Rock Nine and Belafonte. **Members of the Little Rock Nine and Harry Belafonte in Attendance. Location: Argenta Community Theater, 405 Main Street in North Little Rock

Sing Your Song (2011) (105 min). Directed by Susanne Rostock. An up close look at a great American, Harry Belafonte. A patriot to the last and a champion for worldwide human rights, Belafonte is one of the truly heroic cultural and political figures of the past 60 years. Told from Harry’s point of view, the film charts his life from a boy born in New York and raised in Jamaica, who returns to Harlem in his early teens where he discovers the American Negro Theater and the magic of performing. From there the film follows Belafonte’s rise from the jazz and folk clubs of Greenwich Village and Harlem to his emergence as a star. However, even as a superstar, the life of a black man in 1960s America was far from easy and Belafonte was confronted with the same Jim Crow laws and prejudices that every other black man, woman and child in America was facing.