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9 TH ANNUAL
MAY 11-17
2015

7 Questions with Kristin Mann, Producer of Pillow and The Orderly

              1. Are you an Arkansas Native? If so where are you from? If not, How did you get here? Yes, I was born and raised in the Little Rock area.  I’ve spent some time in New York and several years in Los Angeles for work but returned to Arkansas a couple of years ago. 2. What is the inspiration for your film? I’m excited to say that I produced two of the films in this year’s festival – PILLOW and THE ORDERLY.  PILLOW was written and directed by the Miller brothers, and THE ORDERLY was written and directed by Daniel Campbell. The Miller brothers have been heavily influenced by Hitchcock and the Coen brothers among others.  With PILLOW, they’ve done an excellent job with establishing their southern gothic filmmaking style. Daniel, I know, finds inspiration in Wes Anderson’s work.  THE ORDERLY is a comedy, which should excite you because Daniel is one of the funniest people I’ve ever met. I’m going to let these guys tell you what inspired them to write each story.  Stay tuned for their interviews over the next few weeks! 3. Can you give us a brief synopsis of your film? PILLOW is a southern gothic tale of two brothers who go to desperate measures to please their overbearing mother. I honestly can’t say much more than that for fear of giving too much away, but Kim Voynar, a film critic at Movie City News, described PILLOW as “gorgeously, stunningly shot, with minimal dialogue and a script with shades OF MICE AND MEN.”  So, there’s a little taste....

BOBGOBLIN to reunite for LRFF Music Video Competition

I lived in Dallas in the mid 90’s and there was no bigger band in town than MCA recording artists Bobgoblin. They were, and are, a punk band with incredible melody and a crazy concept to match that has something to do with Big Brother, the future, and a revolution led by a rock band in flight suits. Check out this video from a show at the legendary Dallas club Trees in Deep Ellum. Lead singer Hop Litzwire is from Little Rock, and big props to LRFF Party Promoter Mike Poe for booking the band to play this year’s Arkansas Music Video Competition at the Rev Room on June 2. Following a screening of the competition videos and a set from some of the bands nominated for the top prize, Bobgoblin will World Premiere their new video, and play a show that nobody will want to say they...

Razorback Basketball Star to the LRFF

If you were a fan of Arkansas Razorback Basketball in the early 90’s when we ruled the World, then you probably remember Guy Whitney. Check out his highlight reel: After college Guy went to play ball in Europe, and after a career ending injury he moved to NYC to pursue acting. He comes to the 2011 LRFF as the star of the indie film The Crab. Watch the Trailer here: I spoke with Guy, about Razorback Basketball, the transition to acting, and the move to NYC and back again. A lot of people in Arkansas will remember you for your time as a Razorback Basketball player? What happened to you after you graduated and how did you get involved in acting? After graduation i went to Iceland to start a pro-ball career in Europe. I had a minor knee injury that I turned into a career ending injury by playing hurt for 4 months. When I returned from Iceland, I made a conscious decision not to jump directly into anything other than my dream job. But since my whole identity had been created around basketball, I had no idea what that was. So for a couple of years I just wandered and explored: worked odd jobs at the mall, a lumber mill, washed dishes, went back to Europe. I made it a point to run in different circles and didn’t watch a second of basketball on t.v. I did my best to leave that part of my life behind which isn’t always easy for an ex-Razorback in Arkansas. I gradually built up the courage to admit that I wanted...

7 Questions with Gerry Bruno, the director of Seven Souls

1. Are you an Arkansas Native? If so where are you from? If not, How did you get here? No. I’ve been in Arkansas for about 2 ½ years. I was born in Italy but grew up in New Jersey where I was running a commercial production company. I never set out to do commercials but the opportunity was there and in this business you can’t pass on opportunities. After 13 years though, my wife and I tired on the East Coast and started looking for a place where we could slow down. Arkansas was not originally on our radar but after visiting my father-in-law, who had been here about 5 years, we thought it was beautiful. We were so pleasantly surprised to find a vibrant arts community and so many talented people looking to collaborate. 2. What is the inspiration for your film? The inspiration for “Seven Souls” came from the idea I had about Death falling in love with a mortal person. That idea has been done so we took it a step further by asking the question, “What happens when we die?” No one can really be sure what the afterlife is like, which makes this genre so interesting to explore. 3. Can you give us a brief synopsis of your film? “Seven Souls” is an unconventional love story that follows Death, as he roams the earth repaying the debt every human being owes the world: to help seven souls cross over before he himself can rest. But Death cannot stand much more… especially when it comes to the seventh soul he’s asked to take. 4....

7 Questions with Eric Dietz, the director of Never Stop Running

1. Are you an Arkansas Native? If so where are you from? If not, How did you get here? No I am not a native of Arkansas.  I am actually from Ashland, Virginia, right outside of Richmond.  My family and I moved to Arkansas back in the summer of 1998, I was 12 years old.  Dad works in radio broadcasting and so his job moved us here.  So I grew up here through middle school, high school, college, and of course now I work here. 2. What is the inspiration for your film? The biggest inspiration for my film would have to be video games, specifically the first person shooter games like the Left 4 Dead series, Bioshock, and Call of Duty.  I wanted to do a zombie film that would not only immerse the viewer but also tell the story of an outbreak from a different point of view (no pun intended.)  There are films like Cloverfield and Quarantine that are “Found Footage” movies from the camera’s point of view and not one person.  Another film, Doom (which was based on a video game), had a short sequence that was from the first person point of view of one character, but it was all done with a green screen.  I wanted to make a film from the first person point of view of one character from beginning to end, with a camera shooting in the physical world and shot in a way to hide the cuts in the film. 3. Can you give us a brief synopsis of your film? Never Stop Running is the first person point...